Monday, September 23, 2013

Home health care workers get recognition

OT, minimum wage extended to health care workers

New rules for home health care workers
may limit access for some families.
The Obama administration approved rules that extend minimum wage and overtime pay to nearly 2 million home health care workers who help the elderly and disabled with everyday tasks such as bathing, eating or taking medicine, according to an AP report.

Home care aides have been exempt from federal wage laws since 1974, when they were placed in the same category as neighborhood baby sitters. But their ranks have surged with the aging population and the field is now one of the fastest-growing professions.

Labor unions and worker advocacy groups have been seeking the change for years, arguing that nearly half of caregivers live at or below the poverty level or receive public benefits such as food stamps and Medicaid.

But some health care companies claim new overtime requirements will make it tougher for families to afford home care for their aging parents. Lobbyists for the $84 billion industry argue the new requirements could reduce the quality of care and even lower the take-home pay of caregivers if companies decide not to send workers out for shifts longer than eight hours.

The new rules will take effect in January 2015, which will give time for states and industry providers to adjust to the new requirements. New wage and hour rules typically take effect within 60 days after final approval. The rules cover home health aides, personal care aides and certified nursing assistants that provide care to the elderly and people with injuries, illnesses and disabilities.

President Barack Obama first proposed the rules nearly two years ago as part of broader effort to boost the economy and help low-income workers struggling to make ends meet. More than 90 percent of home care aides are women. About 30 percent are black, and 12 percent are Hispanic.

Experts estimated that by 2020, the country would need about 4 million home care aides to meet the needs of its graying population. The number of Americans over 65 is expected to nearly double over the next 20 years.

Fifteen states already extend state minimum wage and overtime protections to home care workers, and another six states and Washington, D.C., mandate state minimum wage protections.

The current median pay for home care workers is about $9.70 per hour, higher than the federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour, according to Labor Department figures. But overtime pay could help lift wages substantially for those who work more than 40 hours a week.

The new rules will continue to exempt from minimum wage and overtime requirements those workers who mainly visit the elderly to provide company or engage in hobbies and are employed directly by the person or family receiving services.

Source: ABC News

Adjust IAQ in home care situations

Illness and disease can lead to bad odors and poor indoor air quality. Opening windows regularly helps but is not always feasible.

For better indoor air quality and healthier air, home health care aides can use portable and reliable indoor air cleaners with the right types of filters.

The air cleaners need activated carbon, HEPA and UV germicidal filtration to remove airborne contaminants such as bacteria, viruses, odors, chemicals, particles and mold.

Electrocorp has designed a variety of indoor air cleaners for the healthcare system. Contact Electrocorp for more information.

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